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CSR2-(v4)
Tuesday 7 May 2013: The Foreign Correspondents' Club, Hong Kong
Wednesday 8 May 2013: The Chamber, The Arts House at the Old Parliament, Singapore


CSR Asia and The Media Alliance are organizing a series of one-day seminars on 'The CSR practices and policies of the Media, Advertising and Entertainment Sectors in Asia'. The events will examine best policies and practices of media companies in giving visibility to social, humanitarian, environmental and sustainable development issues through programming content and social issue and public service advertising.

The seminars will look at examples of institutionalized practices and policies of CSR in companies in the running of their technical and administrative operations, such as through efforts to be carbon neutral, in supporting educational initiatives and in supporting national and community emergency and disaster response systems. Representatives from the areas of Media, Advertising and Entertainment will discuss whether these sectors fulfill their roles when it comes to accurately and unbiasedly improving the public’s understanding of sustainable development issues including health, education, environment and sustainable economic development. And what additional roles can these sectors deliver and how do they demonstrate CSR themselves?

The events will also serve as a platform for the collection of best practices and lessons learned for submission to a new global initiative by the World Economic Forum (WEF) and US-based Ad Council, titled 'Creative For Good' - an online resource for best practices of effective campaigns addressing social issues. The initiative is designed to increase the dialogue on social issue advertising and to identify the number and effectiveness of such campaigns worldwide.
HONG KONG PROGRAMME

8:30am - Registration

9:00am - Introduction:

Media companies can be more than just entities that provide products and services. They have the potential to be vehicles and mediums for positive change among the audiences they reach – as a result of their own values and commitment to a more sustainable future. Media companies have the power to educate, and shift minds and hearts on key social and environmental issues that can lead to lasting change, not only through their content and programming, but also through their operating practices. This includes policies around transparency and accountability, editorial policies, public service announcements and campaigns that promote sustainability or social responsibility. At a time when corporations are increasingly held accountable and at a time when CSR is good practice for business, what are the CSR practices and polices of the Media, Advertising and Entertainment Sectors in Asia? Why is this sector relevant to us all?

9.15 am - Setting the Scene:

The Role of Media in Sustainable Development – Building Critical Mass Awareness through Multi-Sector Partnerships with (1) Development Agencies, Multi-lateral Institutions and NGOs; (2) the Media, Advertising and Entertainment Sector; and (3) Private-sector corporations. How do they and can they work together to address sustainability and benefit the CSR of the private-sector?

9:30am - Session 1: Advertising – The Role and Responsibility of Agencies

Advertising is a US$450 billion a year industry. And that’s before the revenue from merchandise sales are factored in. But of that figure, less than 1% is spent on social advertising. And yet advertising shapes the consumption, values and behaviors of billions of consumers, fueling the consumption cycles of natural resources and the generation of vast amounts of waste. The advertising industry is believed to be an enabler of the cycle of consumption and waste. So, what is the corporate social responsibility of the advertising sector? Illustrating his talk with campaigns that have made real impact, our keynote speaker explains the role agencies can play, and shows how they demonstrate CSR themselves. 

10:30am - Coffee Break 

11:00am - Session 2: Media Campaigns – Social Issue Advertising

On the one hand, it’s easy for media companies to apply core competencies to CSR. They are in the best possible position to reach mass audiences and promote social issue awareness. And many of them often do. What are some of the best and most effective campaigns currently running, initiated and led by the media companies off their own backs, without prompting from third parties? And what type of campaigns initiated by NGOs and multi-laterals are media companies likely to support?

12:00 noon - Session 3: Media and Advertising Companies – Core Competencies, Sustainable Development, Public Sector and Civil Society

It’s not all about media space and content. Media, Advertising and Entertainment companies have other core competencies that lend to sustainability. From providing emergency warning systems for natural disasters and national security, to enhancing electronic communications in reducing carbon emissions and the consumption of natural resources, to protecting the rights of journalists and the transparency and accountability of both public and private sector. What role do media and advertising companies deliver on CSR through their core competencies other serving as the mouthpiece for their own causes and those of third parties?

1:00pm - Networking Lunch

2:00pm - Session 4: Partnering with Media, Advertising and Entertainment – Examples from the private sector

Many companies have employed tactics to reflect sensitivity to cultural, social, religious and racial diversity, environmental preservation, gender equality and other issues. From Benneton to Body Shop to Nike, these companies have positioned themselves as beacons of progressive ideals. But to what extent are these marketing tactics genuine reflections of the corporate culture and not merely ‘blue-washing’ or ‘green-washing’? We hear from corporate representatives on these communications and marketing tactics, the role of environmental social governance and risk management, the use of sustainability reports in assessing corporate performance, and the role of business associations in promoting awareness of sustainable development issues.

3:30pm - Coffee Break

4:00pm - Session 5: Media Companies – Responsible Reporting

It is also the media’s corporate social responsibility to accurately report social and sustainable development issues in a balanced, informed manner in such a way that stakeholders are not unfairly misrepresented. What are the opportunities for private-sector companies to work with media in CSR?

4:45pm - Closing Comments

SINGAPORE PROGRAMME

8:30am - Registration

9:00am - Introduction:

Media companies can be more than just entities that provide products and services. They have the potential to be vehicles and mediums for positive change among the audiences they reach – as a result of their own values and commitment to a more sustainable future. Media companies have the power to educate, and shift minds and hearts on key social and environmental issues that can lead to lasting change, not only through their content and programming, but also through their operating practices. This includes policies around transparency and accountability, editorial policies, public service announcements and campaigns that promote sustainability or social responsibility. At a time when corporations are increasingly held accountable and at a time when CSR is good practice for business, what are the CSR practices and polices of the Media, Advertising and Entertainment Sectors in Asia? Why is this sector relevant to us all?

9.15 am - Setting the Scene:

The Role of Media in Sustainable Development – Building Critical Mass Awareness through Multi-Sector Partnerships with (1) Development Agencies, Multi-lateral Institutions and NGOs; (2) the Media, Advertising and Entertainment Sector; and (3) Private-sector corporations. How do they and can they work together to address sustainability and benefit the CSR of the private-sector?

9:30am - Session 1: Advertising – The Role and Responsibility of Agencies

Advertising is a US$450 billion a year industry - and PR adds about another US$25 billion to that figure. And that’s before the revenue from merchandise sales are factored in. But of that figure, less than 1% is spent on social advertising. And yet advertising shapes the consumption, values and behaviors of billions of consumers, fueling the consumption cycles of natural resources and the generation of vast amounts of waste. The advertising and PR industry is an enabler of the cycle of consumption and waste. So, what is the corporate social responsibility of the advertising and PR sectors? What roles do they deliver and how do they demonstrate CSR themselves? 

10:30am - Coffee Break 

11:00am - Session 2: Media Campaigns – Social Issue Advertising

On the one hand, it’s easy for media companies to apply core competencies to CSR. They are in the best possible position to reach mass audiences and promote social issue awareness. And many of them often do. What are some of the best and most effective campaigns currently being supported by media companies, and what type of campaigns initiated by NGOs and multi-laterals are media companies likely to support? What are the secrets to establishing partnerships with media to achieve maximum audience reach and the private sector for funding support?

12:00 noon - Session 3: Media and Advertising Companies – Core Competencies, Sustainable Development, Public Sector and Civil Society

It’s not all about media space and content. Media, Advertising and Entertainment companies have other core competencies that lend to sustainability. From providing emergency warning systems for natural disasters and national security, to enhancing electronic communications in reducing carbon emissions and the consumption of natural resources, to protecting the rights of journalists and the transparency and accountability of both public and private sector. What role do media and advertising companies deliver on CSR through their core competencies other serving as the mouthpiece for their own causes and those of third parties?

1:00pm - Networking Lunch

2:00pm - Session 4: Partnering with Media, Advertising and Entertainment – Examples from the private sector

Many companies have employed tactics to reflect sensitivity to cultural, social, religious and racial diversity, environmental preservation, gender equality and other issues. From Benneton to Body Shop to Nike, these companies have positioned themselves as beacons of progressive ideals. But to what extent are these marketing tactics genuine reflections of the corporate culture and not merely ‘blue-washing’ or ‘green-washing’? We hear from corporate representatives on these communications and marketing tactics.

3:15pm - Coffee Break

3:45pm - Session 5: Partnering with Media, Advertising and Entertainment – Examples from the public sector and civil society – MLIs, NGOs, CSOs

Social issue advertising and communication for development are crucial activities for development agencies, multi-lateral institutions, non-governmental and civil society organizations. But they often lack budgets and are limited in the extent to which they can sustain audience outreach. Collaboration with media companies, advertising agencies and private sector CSR are measures employed to build visibility of sustainable development issues.

5:00pm - Session 6: Media Companies – Responsible Reporting

It is also the media’s corporate social responsibility to accurately report social and sustainable development issues in a balanced, informed manner in such a way that stakeholders are not unfairly misrepresented. What are the opportunities for private-sector companies to work with media in CSR?

6:00pm - Closing Comments

Media Sector Partners


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Advertising Sector Partners




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Regional News Distribution Partner

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Non-governmental and Multilateral Partners

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Corporate and Private Sector Partners